Departmental Policies and Expectations

Navigating Policies and Procedures

Many questions about how to meet expectations and thrive as a graduate student can be answered by the various sources of policies, procedures, requirements, resources, and norms below. We urge and encourage you to connect with these resources when you have questions or concerns.

Graduate Program Manager (GPM)expand_more

Each graduate program will have at least one department staff person who serves as a point person for program policy and procedures. These staff are well versed in most elements of graduate education that extend beyond academic instruction in your program and will likely be your first stop for questions related to topics in this handbook.

Director of Graduate Studies (DGS)expand_more

Each graduate program has one faculty member designated to direct its educational vision and structure.

Francisco Penagaricano

Principle Investigator (PI)expand_more

Each student will be assigned a PI in each graduate program in which they are enrolled. Your PI(s) will be a source of guidance for your academic development. The name and contact information of your PI can be found on your Student Center on MyUW (my.wisc.edu) under “Academic Progress” and then “Advisors.”

Advising relationships are a central part of academia, important to both the experience and development of students and faculty members alike.

The Graduate School defines an advisor as a faculty member from the program responsible for providing advice regarding graduate studies and for supervising a student’s degree program (including research). Your PI has two main roles: 1) To assist you in acquiring the highest possible level of knowledge and competence in the field, and 2) to chair the Mentor Committee that will determine whether you have performed at an acceptable level in each of your degree milestones.

Your PI may assist with course selection, planning your academic path, and helping you identify possible research mentors, committee members, and research opportunities. PIs are expected to help you apply for funds to cover direct research costs and to provide a stipend as agreed upon in the appointment. The student and PI are responsible for communicating their expectations to each other.

Clearly defined expectations for the student and PI are a crucial starting point for a strong relationship. Our General Expectations Compact contains expectations that should be discussed and agreed upon with your PI as soon as possible upon arrival.

Research Animal Resources and Compliance (RARC)expand_more

RARC’s animal program assessment specialists are a key resource for investigators, helping them maintain compliance with applicable rules, regulations, and policies to ensure successful research projects. We help labs prepare for AAALAC visits, work with USDA inspectors, provide information and guidance on compliance with DEA regulations, and perform focused protocol reviews.

Anyone with a UW NetID may take an RARC open-access course. Individuals must be listed as research or teaching staff on an approved protocol to sign up for RARC closed-access courses. Staff members unsure of their status on a protocol should contact the principal investigator. Training Records shows what courses protocol members are required to complete.

For questions or concerns, contact an RARC trainer.

Biological Safetyexpand_more

The UW-Madison Office of Biological Safety (OBS) assists all faculty and staff in observing safe laboratory practices for biological materials as prescribed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and endeavors to assure that research is done in secure facilities in compliance with all local, state, and federal regulations. The OBS is the administrative office of the Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC).

Contact:
biosafety@fpm.wisc.edu
Phone: 608-263-2037
Fax: 608-262-6767

Chemical Safetyexpand_more

The UW-Madison Chemical Safety Office, working in conjunction with the campus Chemical Safety Committee, establishes policies and procedures for the safe acquisition, use, storage, and disposal of chemicals on campus.

The Chemical Safety Office also advises campus chemical users on best practices and helps the university community comply with federal, state, and local chemical and environmental safety laws.

Contact:
chemsafety@fpm.wisc.edu
Phone: 608-265-5700

Radiation Safetyexpand_more

The Office of Radiation Safety provides the following services:

  • Policy and standard development related to radiation safety regulatory matters with a focus on cost containment.
  • University of Wisconsin representation and intermediary to DHS, EPA, NRC, NIH, OSHA, USDA, FDA, CDC, DOE, DOT, other federal, state, and local regulatory agencies, neighboring communities, and professional organizations.
  • Technical assistance and evaluation to assess and communicate risks.
  • Investigation of incidents, exposures.
  • Authorizations, certifications, and other in-house requirements.
  • Implementation of customized programs in radiation protection.
  • Training and education.
  • Collection and maintenance of records regarding exposures, waste, compliance and audits, permits and incidents.
  • Oversight of inspection and testing of campus radiation safety equipment and protection systems.
  • Emergency planning and response.
  • Representation and support to relevant campus committees.
  • Centralized ordering, receiving, and distribution (CORD) of radioactive materials.
  • Negotiation of contract pricing for radioactive materials.
  • Transportation and Shipping of radioactive material

Policies and Procedures

Satisfactory academic progressexpand_more

Continuation as a graduate student at UW-Madison is at the discretion of the program, the Graduate School, and the PI. Any student may be placed on probation or dismissed from the Graduate School for not maintaining satisfactory academic progress, and this can impact their academic standing (detailed below), financial aid, or funding (consult sources of funding, as applicable). Our program has its own definition of satisfactory academic progress and related procedures that supplement Graduate School policy, as described in this section.

Definition and Expectations

The Department of ADS follows the Graduate School’s guidelines regarding satisfactory progress in terms of enrollment, grades, and GPA.

General guidelines for all studentsexpand_more

  • Maintain an overall graduate GPA of 3.0 or above (policy).
  • Earn grades of B or above in required courses (review Doctoral or Master’s General Requirements for more information on required courses). If a grade in a required course is below a B, the course must be repeated. Required courses may only be repeated once. Failure to receive a B or higher in the repeated course may result in dismissal from the program.
  • Enroll each semester according to the Graduate School minimum enrollment requirements (policy) and the department’s enrollment requirements (below).
  • Meet with PI at minimum once per year for an Annual Review of Academic Progress Meeting.
  • Make progress on completing relevant coursework in a timely fashion. This includes core coursework, minor coursework, and satisfying Graduate School credit requirements.
  • Make satisfactory progress in research as judged by the PI.
  • Submit complete certification paperwork in a timely manner as outlined in the requirement section below.

Annual Review of Academic Progress Meetingexpand_more

All students are required to participate in an Annual Review of Academic Progress meeting with their PI each year. The Progress Report must be completed and submitted by the end of each academic year (June) but may occur any time during the year. The Department highly recommends the Progress Report be shared with the student’s Mentor and Examination Committee each year for review and input.

This evaluation provides a mechanism for the student to review their overall progress towards their degree and to identify areas of strength and weakness in their development as an independent scientist. The Progress Report is a tool for the PI to ensure the student is making satisfactory research progress toward achievement of the degree. If the PI believes sufficient progress is not being made or is unlikely to be made, the PI should follow the steps outlined in the Not Meeting Academic Expectations section below.

Before the meetingexpand_more

The student must:

  1. Schedule a Progress Report meeting.
  2. Prepare a short oral presentation (approximately 30 min) of research progress.
  3. Download and complete the top section of the Progress Report.
  4. Indicate whether the yearly seminar requirement has been met.
  5. Provide the form to your PI (paper or electronic) at least one week prior to the scheduled meeting.

During the meetingexpand_more

The student must:

  1. Seek PI’s input about your career development plans.
  2. Present an oral report describing the past year’s accomplishments.

The student and PI must:

  1. Discuss the student’s progress.
    • Students planning to graduate within the next year must solicit committee input on their proposed graduation timeline.
    • Ultimately, the PI is responsible for providing feedback to the student and determining satisfactory progress. For unsatisfactory progress, the PI should follow the steps outlined in the Not Meeting Academic Expectations below.

After the meetingexpand_more

The PI must complete, sign, and email the Progress Report to the student and the GPM before the beginning of the next academic year. It is highly recommended that these reports are shared with the student’s Mentor and Examination Committee each year for review and input.

Not meeting academic expectationsexpand_more

The status of a student can be one of three options:

  1. Good standing – progressing according to standards; any funding guarantee remains in place.
  2. Probation – not progressing according to standards but permitted to enroll; loss of funding guarantee; specific plan with dates and deadlines in place regarding removal of probationary status.
  3. Unsatisfactory progress – not progressing according to standards; not permitted to enroll, dismissal, leave of absence or change of PI or program.

Student progress will be reviewed during the Annual Review of Academic Progress Meeting. The Department highly recommends that the PI discusses student progress with the student and the student’s Mentor and Examination Committee frequently to develop strategies to improve progress throughout their academic career.

If the PI believes that a student has failed to achieve satisfactory progress in the academic expectations set in this handbook and that the strategies developed with the student and the student’s committee have been unsuccessful, then the PI will contact the GPM to discuss appropriate next steps. If, after speaking with the GPM, the PI decides a Progress Improvement Plan (PIP) is needed, then the student and GPM will be notified in writing from the PI. The student will be given an opportunity to develop a written PIP. This plan will be developed collaboratively with the student and PI to include a timeline of when improvements need to be made and specific steps/goals that the student must achieve by the end of the outlined timeline. Please review a sample PIP here: Badger, Bucky Progress Improvement Plan.

If, after the PIP timeline has passed and the student has not completed the agreed upon goals, then the PI will notify the student in writing and the student will have 2 weeks to submit a written response. The PI and RGEC will review the response within 2 weeks and determine if further action is needed. Students may be dismissed from the program.

Students may, alternatively, be placed on probation for one semester and then reviewed by the RGEC following the probationary semester. Students placed on probation may be dismissed or allowed to continue based upon review of progress during the probationary semester. If a student wishes to appeal any decision stemming from this review process, they can do so within 2 weeks of the date of the decision letter through submitting a letter to the chair and requesting a new hearing with the addition of a faculty member external to the original committee.

Additionally, a student may be placed on probation or suspended from the Graduate School for low grades or for failing to resolve incompletes in a timely fashion. In special cases the Graduate School permits students who do not meet these minimum standards to continue probation upon recommendation and support of their PI.

Personal conduct expectationsexpand_more

This graduate program, the Graduate School, and the Division of Student Life uphold the UW-System policies and procedures in place for academic and non-academic misconduct. In addition, graduate students are held to the same standards of responsible conduct of research as faculty and staff. Furthermore, unprofessional behavior towards clients/subjects, faculty, staff, peers, and public are significant issues in the evaluation and promotion of students. In turn, we hold expectations for the highest level of academic integrity and expect professional, ethical, and respectful conduct in all interactions. Students may be disciplined or dismissed from the graduate program for misconduct or disregard for professional conduct expectations regardless of their academic standing in the program. Separate from a violation of Professional Conduct, a student may face University disciplinary action about the same action. Students are responsible for reading the information here as well as the information published on all relevant web sites. Lack of knowledge of this information does not excuse any infraction.

Professional conductexpand_more

The Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards maintains detailed guidance on student rights and responsibilities related to learning in a community that is safe and fosters integrity and accountability. Students are responsible for maintaining awareness of these policies and procedures.

Students are expected to adhere to the highest standards of professional behavior and ethics. Students should avoid even an appearance of improper behavior or lack of ethical standards while in Graduate School at UW-Madison, in all professional settings, and in their personal lives. Students should conduct themselves according to the standards expected of members of the profession to which the student aspires. Concerns about infractions of Professional Conduct may be effectively handled informally between the instructor/PI and the student. If a resolution is not achieved, a graduate program representative may be included in the discussion.

Professional ethicsexpand_more

Students shall show respect for a diversity of opinions, perspectives, and cultures; accurately represent their work and acknowledge the contributions of others; participate in and commit to related opportunities; aim to gain knowledge and contribute to the knowledge base of others; understand the UW Student Code of Conduct; represent their profession and the program; and strive to incorporate and practice disciplinary ideals in their daily lives. Resumes/CVs must reflect accurate information.

Honesty and integrityexpand_more

Students shall demonstrate honesty and integrity as shown by their challenging of themselves in academic pursuits; honesty and ethics in research and IRB applications—including honesty in interpretation of data, commitment to an unbiased interpretation of academic and professional endeavors; and the need to document research activities, protect subject/client confidentiality and HIPPA regulations. Students shall follow-through and pull their weight in group activities and understand where collaboration among students is or is not allowed; not plagiarize others or past work (self-plagiarism), cheat, or purposefully undermine the work of others; and avoid conflicts of interest for the duration of their time in the program. As a professional, honesty and integrity also extends to personal behavior in life outside of the academic setting by realizing that students are representatives of the program, UW-Madison, and the profession.

Interpersonal and workplace relationshipsexpand_more

Students shall interact with peers, faculty, staff, and those they encounter in their professional capacity in a manner that is respectful, considerate, and professional. This includes and is not limited to attending all scheduled meetings, honoring agreed upon work schedules, being on-time and prepared for work/meetings, contributing collaboratively to the team, keeping the lines of communication open, offering prompt response to inquiries, and employing respectful use of available equipment/technology/resources. Chronic or unexplained absences are unprofessional in the workplace and could be grounds for termination or removal of funding. To facilitate the free and open exchange of ideas, any criticism shall be offered in a constructive manner, and the right of others to hold different opinions shall be respected.

Commitment to learningexpand_more

Students are expected to always meet their educational responsibilities. Be actively prepared for class and be ready for questions and answers. Be on time for every class and always show courtesy during class or if they must leave class early. If possible, students should notify the instructor at least one day in advance of a planned absence. Students who are unable to attend class are responsible for finding out what occurred that day and should not expect instructors to give them individual instruction. Recognizing that the pursuit of knowledge is a continuous process, students shall show commitment to learning by persevering despite adversity and seeking guidance to adapt to change. Students shall strive for academic excellence and pursue and incorporate all critique, both positive and negative, in the acquisition of knowledge to understand and respect the community in which they work.

Professional appearanceexpand_more

Students shall convey a positive, professional appearance to represent the program in a dignified manner. Appearance includes a person’s dress, hygiene, and appropriate etiquette/protocols for the environment (including safety protocols and protective clothing in environments that require them).

Academic misconductexpand_more

Academic misconduct is governed by state law, UW System Administration Code Chapter 14. For further information on what constitutes academic misconduct and procedures related to academic misconduct, see below.

Office of Student Conduct and Community Standardsexpand_more

Academic Misconduct Website

Academic Misconduct Flowchart

Examples of academic misconduct include but are not limited to:

  • cutting and pasting text from the Web without quotation marks or proper citation;
  • paraphrasing from the Web without crediting the source;
  • using notes or a programmable calculator in an exam when such use is not allowed;
  • using another person’s ideas, words, or research and presenting it as one’s own by not properly crediting the originator;
  • stealing examinations or course materials;
  • changing or creating data in a lab experiment;
  • altering a transcript;
  • signing another person’s name to an attendance sheet;
  • hiding a book knowing that another student needs it to prepare for an assignment;
  • collaboration that is contrary to the stated rules of the course; or
  • tampering with a lab experiment or computer program of another student.

Non-academic misconductexpand_more

Non-academic misconduct is governed by state law, UW System Administration Code Chapters 17 and 18. For further information on these laws, what constitutes non-academic misconduct, and procedures related to non-academic misconduct, see below.

University of Wisconsin System (UWS)expand_more

Chapter 17: Student Non-Academic Disciplinary Procedures 

Chapter 18: Conduct on University Lands 

Examples of non-academic misconduct include but are not limited to:

  • engaging in conduct that is a crime involving danger to property or persons, as defined in UWS 18.06(22)(d);
  • attacking or otherwise physically abusing, threatening to physically injure, or physically intimidating a member of the university community or a guest;
  • attacking or throwing rocks or other dangerous objects at law enforcement personnel, or inciting others to do so;
  • selling or delivering a controlled substance, as defined in 161 Wis. Stats., or possessing a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver;
  • removing, tampering with, or otherwise rendering useless university equipment or property intended for use in preserving or protecting the safety of members of the university community, such as fire alarms, fire extinguisher, fire exit signs, first aid equipment, or emergency telephones; or obstructing fire escape routes;
  • preventing or blocking physical entry to or exit from a university building, corridor, or room;
  • engaging in shouted interruptions, whistling, or similar means of interfering with a classroom presentation or a university-sponsored speech or program;
  • obstructing a university officer or employee engaged in the lawful performance of duties;
  • obstructing or interfering with a student engaged in attending classes or participating in university-run or university-authorized activities;
  • knowingly disrupting access to university computing resources or misusing university computing resources.

Research misconductexpand_more

Much of graduate education is carried out in laboratories and other research venues that are often supported by federal or other external funding sources. It is often difficult to distinguish between academic misconduct and cases of research misconduct. Graduate students are held to the same standards of responsible conduct of research as faculty and staff. The Graduate School is responsible for investigating allegations of research misconduct. This is often done in consultation with the Division of Student Life as well as with federal and state agencies to monitor, investigate, determine sanctions, and train about the responsible conduct of research.

Please see Grievance Process section below for further information on reporting research misconduct of others.

The Graduate Schoolexpand_more

Responsible Conduct of Research

  • Animal Care and Use in Research
  • Authorship
  • Conflict of Interest
  • Human Research Protections
  • Intellectual Property Rights
  • Misconduct of Research
  • Patents
  • Research Regulatory Compliance

Process and sanctions for violations of personal conduct expectationsexpand_more

Failure to meet the program’s personal conduct expectations as outlined in this section can result in disciplinary action including immediate dismissal from the program depending on the infraction. If a student has violated an expectation in this section, the PI will consult with the student’s Mentor Committee to determine if/what disciplinary action or dismissal is recommended.

The PI will notify the student in writing within 2 weeks of the committee meeting with the determination. The student will have 2 weeks to submit a written response. The PI and RGEC will review the response within 2 weeks and determine if further action is needed.

Students may, alternatively, be placed on probation for one semester and then reviewed by the RGEC following the probationary semester. Students placed on probation may be dismissed or allowed to continue based upon review of progress during the probationary semester. If a student wishes to appeal any decision stemming from this review process, they can do so within 2 weeks of the date of the decision letter through submitting a letter to the chair and requesting a new hearing with the addition of a faculty member external to the original committee.

Students may be disciplined or dismissed from the graduate program for any type of misconduct (academic, non-academic, professional, or research) or failure to meet program expectations regardless of their academic standing in the program. Separate and apart from a violation of Professional Conduct, a student may face University disciplinary action regarding the same action. Concerns about infractions of the Professional Conduct may be effectively handled informally between the student and the PI /faculty member. However, if a resolution is not achieved, the issue may be advanced for further review by the program.

Program disciplinary actionsexpand_more

This is not an exhaustive list.

  • Written reprimand
  • Denial of specified privilege(s)
  • Imposition of specific terms and conditions on continued student status
  • Removal of funding
  • Probation
  • Restitution
  • Removal of the student from the course(s) in progress
  • Failure to promote
  • Withdrawal of an offer of admission
  • Placement on leave of absence for a determined amount of time
  • Suspension from the program, ranging from one semester to four years
  • Suspension from the program for up to one year with the stipulation that remedial activities may be required as a condition of readmission. Students who meet the readmission condition must apply for readmission and may be admitted on a space-available basis.
  • Dismissal from the program
  • Denial of a degree

Dean of Students Office disciplinary actionsexpand_more

In addition to the program’s disciplinary actions, the Dean of Students Office may also have grounds to issue one or more of the following:

  • Reprimand
  • Restitution
  • Probation
  • Suspension
  • Expulsion
  • A zero or failing grade on an assignment/exam
  • A lower grade or failure in the course
  • Conditions/terms of continuing as a student
  • Removal from course
  • Enrollment restrictions in a course/program

Grievance processexpand_more

If a student feels unfairly treated or aggrieved by faculty, staff, or another student, the University offers several avenues to resolve the grievance. Students’ concerns about unfair treatment are best handled directly with the person responsible for the objectionable action. If the student is uncomfortable making direct contact with the individual(s) involved, they should contact the PI or the person in charge of the unit where the action occurred (program or department chair, section chair, lab manager, etc.).

The Graduate School has procedures for students wishing to appeal a grievance decision made at the school/college level. These policies are described in the Graduate School’s Academic Policies and Procedures.

Student grievanceexpand_more

  1. The student should speak with the person toward whom the grievance is directed to attempt to resolve the situation.
  2. Should a satisfactory resolution not be achieved, the student should contact the program’s GPM or DGS to discuss the grievance
    1. The GPM or DGS will facilitate problem resolution through informal channels and facilitate any complaints or issues of students. The first attempt is to help students informally address the grievance prior to any formal complaint. Students should speak with their PIs regarding concerns or difficulties.
  3. If the issue is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction, then the student can submit the grievance to the GPM in writing, within 60 calendar days of the alleged unfair treatment.
    1. Upon receipt of a written complaint, a faculty committee will be convened by the GPM to manage the grievance. The committee will obtain a written response from the person toward whom the complaint is directed. This response will be shared with the person filing the grievance.
    2. The committee will determine a decision regarding the grievance. The GPM will report on the action taken by the committee in writing to both the student and the party toward whom the complaint was directed within 15 working days from the date the complaint was received.
    3. If either party (the student or the person toward whom the grievance is directed) is unsatisfied with the decision of the committee, the party may file a written appeal. Either party has 10 working days to file a written appeal to the School/College.
    4. Documentation of the grievance will be stored for at least 7 years. Significant grievances that set a precedent will be stored indefinitely.

Resources for studentsexpand_more

University resources for sexual harassment, discrimination, disability accommodations, and other related concerns can be found on the UW Office of Equity and Diversity website.

Other campus resources include:

Master’s Degree Requirements

Course Requirements and Certificationexpand_more

Course requirements include a minimum of 30 total credits, at least 16 credits at UW-Madison, at least 15 in didactic courses (formal classes or formal seminar).

All ADS M.S. students must complete their certification paperwork. The student should submit all completed certification paperwork to the Graduate Program Manager (GPM) for review and approval by the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS).

Students should meet with their committee at minimum once per year.

Students must enroll and present in Seminar (900) during their final semester.

Steps to Masters expand_more

The below steps must be completed in a timely fashion (as outlined), or the student will not be allowed to register for following semesters. Working closely with the PI and committee are essential for successful completion of an M.S. The certification paperwork and MS Warrant Request form must be approved before the warrant request is submitted to the Graduate School. Any changes to the certification paperwork must be communicated to the GPM and approved by the DGS.

  1. Form a M.S. Mentor and Examination Committee (form I) and submit completed form to GPM (by end of 1st semester).
  2. Meet with approved committee to approve Plan of Study (form II) and submit completed form to the GPM (by end of 2nd Semester). Regular meetings with M.S. Mentor Committee are expected.
  3. Complete coursework and M.S. research (if applicable). Documentation of completion is required before defense. Students must enroll and present in Seminar (900) during their final semester.
  4. Schedule and successfully complete Final Defense and Examination. Follow specific steps under “Final Defense” below.

Final Defenseexpand_more

The original research conducted by the candidate must be summarized in a thesis. When a student has completed their research and thesis to the satisfaction of their PI and their committee, the student schedules the Final Defense (by the end of the 4th semester). The Mentor Committee administers the thesis defense, through the seminar, which is open to the public unless otherwise requested, and the defense. The candidate may not take the Final Defense until all other requirements for the degree have been satisfied. For additional information, please review the Graduate School’s Completing Your Master’s Degree page.

**If the student has not scheduled their final defense during their 4th semester, then the GPM will schedule a meeting with the GPM, DGS, PI, and student to determine barriers to student’s completion and make a plan for completion.

Prior to the Examexpand_more

  1. At the beginning of their final semester (4th semester), students must enroll in Seminar (900). Students must present their research during this course.
  2. ≥ 6 weeks before the anticipated meeting date the student contacts committee members to establish a date, time, and location for the exam and reserves a room for a 4-hour time block.
    • If the meeting is to be held virtually (via web conference), the student should send the meeting date/times to their PI for scheduling the virtual meeting. The student will ascertain which web-based conferencing system the PI will use to host the meeting and gain competency in presenting materials using that web-based platform.
  3. ≥ 1 month before the scheduled meeting the student should submit Request for Final Examination (form III), and the MS Warrant Request form to the GPM at least four weeks prior to the oral exam date.
  4. Student should submit thesis to all members of the Mentor Committee ≥2 weeks prior to the exam date. The thesis must be acceptable from both scientific and literary standpoints. The committee will notify the student if they have passed.
  5. Student should submit to the GPM (via email) a seminar notice of the Final Defense that includes the Thesis Title, Abstract, Author, Date, and Location at least 1 week before the defense.
  6. Student should prepare materials (suggestions/approximate times below):
    • The open session consists of a formal public seminar (approximately 45-50 min) followed by a short public question and answer period
      • 45 minutes: a presentation of your thesis which must be acceptable from both scientific and literary standpoints.
      • 15 minutes: question/answer period where anyone can participate
    • The closed session immediately follows the open session and consists of an examination period wherein only the examinee and Mentor Committee are present
      • 90 minutes: student completes oral examination with committee
      • 15 minutes: committee determines the exam outcome and notifies student
    • The meeting is expected to take 2-3 hours, but should not exceed 4 hours

During the Examexpand_more

  1. Present the exit seminar on thesis research and answer questions from the public.
  2. Defend the thesis orally in a closed session with committee.
  3. After the examination, the committee will determine the outcome (Pass; Request Written Revisions; Request Written Revisions and a repeat of the Defense; or Fail) concerning the student’s performance and document their feedback on the MS Final Thesis Evaluation form.

After the Exam (if passed with no further actions needed)expand_more

  1. The student must complete the Graduate School steps.
    • Final grade reports must be completed for all courses in progress when student deposits the thesis.
  2. The student will request electronic signatures on the Grad School Warrant. Students can find information about how to do this on the student instruction sheet.
  3. The PI will provide written feedback compiled from the committee members on the MS Final Thesis Evaluation form to the student and the GPM within 1 week of the student completing the exam.

After the Exam (if written revisions are required)expand_more

  1. The PI will provide written feedback compiled from the committee members on the MS Final Thesis Evaluation form to the student and the GPM within 1 week of the student completing the exam.
  2. The student will notify that GPM that the committee is requiring revisions.
  3. Once the student has completed revisions, the revised thesis will be provided to the committee for approval. Once revisions have been approved, the PI will fill out a new MS Final Thesis Evaluation form indicating “written revisions accepted by committee” in the “Feedback / Comments from the Committee” box, sign, and send to the student and GPM.
  4. The student must complete the Graduate School steps.
    • Final grade reports must be completed for all courses in progress when student deposits the thesis.
  5. The student will request electronic signatures on the Grad School Warrant. Students can find information about how to do this on the student instruction sheet.

After the Exam (if written revisions and a repeat of the final defense are required)expand_more

  1. The PI will provide written feedback compiled from the committee members on the MS Final Thesis Evaluation form to the student and the GPM within 1 week of the student completing the exam.
  2. The student will notify the GPM that the committee is requiring revisions and a repeat of the Final Defense.
  3. The student will schedule a new defense with their committee and revise the thesis according to committee feedback.
  4. Once the student has successfully repeated their Final Defense and the committee has approved the revisions, the PI will ensure a new MS Final Thesis Evaluation form is filled out, signed, and returned to the student and GPM. If the student does not pass the second exam, please follow steps under After the Exam (Fail).
  5. The student must complete the Graduate School steps.
    • Final grade reports must be completed for all courses in progress when student deposits the thesis.
  6. The student will request electronic signatures on the Grad School Warrant. Students can find information about how to do this on the student instruction sheet.

After the Exam (Fail)expand_more

  1. If the Final Exam is not successfully completed after two attempts, the student cannot continue in the ADS Program.
  2. The student must discuss recommendations with the PI and the Committee.
    1. The PI must communicate the recommendations to the GPM.
  3. The PI will ensure the MS Final Thesis Evaluation form is filled out, signed, and returned to the student and the GPM.

Mentor Committee Compositionexpand_more

The Mentor Committee members advise the student on their classes, research, other academic components of the students’ Graduate Program, evaluate satisfactory progress, administer the final oral examination, evaluate the thesis, and sign the degree warrant. The PI chairs the committee. The final warrant request including committee membership must be submitted to the Graduate School at least three weeks before the examination date. Please view the Graduate School’s policy on the role and composition of committees and an online tool to determine if the committee meets minimum requirements.

Master’s thesis committees must consist of at least 3 members, 2 of whom must be ADS graduate faculty or former graduate faculty up to one year after resignation or retirement and the third member from outside the department. Non-thesis master’s committees must have at least one graduate faculty from ADS. We recommend that student use the Faculty List for Grad Committees tool when forming the committee.

To receive a master’s degree, students cannot receive more than one dissenting vote from their Mentor Committee on the final degree warrant.

Coursework Only M.S.expand_more

This program provides the opportunity to tailor a curriculum of advanced coursework and research to fit the needs of each student. Students may acquire a general overview of ADS or may focus on a specialized subject area in breeding and genetics, nutrition, endocrinology and reproductive physiology, or meat science and muscle biology. The coursework master’s program must meet the requirements of the department as well as the requirements for the Graduate School. Full-time students can expect to complete the M.S. degree in about two years. The M.S. program can also accommodate part-time students with resulting increased time to degree. The coursework master’s degree is a terminal degree and completion of this degree does not allow automatic admission to a Ph.D. program.

Enrollment Requirements expand_more

The department requires all funded students to be enrolled full time. Students funded by another department should check with the payroll and benefits coordinator of that department to learn their requirements for enrollment. Please review the minimum enrollment requirements for additional clarification. You are responsible for following Graduate School policies related to course enrollment requirements and limitations:

Degree Deadlines expand_more

Degree deadlines are the cut-off dates for a degree and dissertation eligibility in each term, and it is important to keep abreast of these dates when planning to graduate.

View the following for additional information: Graduate School Deadlines.

Exceptions to Requirementsexpand_more

Academic exceptions are considered on a case-by-case basis and should not be considered a precedent. Deviations from normal progress are highly discouraged, but the program recognizes that there are cases extenuating academic and personal circumstances. Petitions for course exceptions/substitutions or exceptions to Satisfactory Academic Progress shall be directed to the DGS and will be considered by the Research and Graduate Education Committee (RGEC).

The following procedures apply to all petitions:

  1. The specific requirement/rule/expectation pertinent to the petition must be identified.
  2. The PI must provide written support for the petition to the GPM and the DGS. The request should include a justification statement and a detailed explanation of the substitution proposed to meet the requirement.
  3. All course work substitutions and equivalencies will be decided by the DGS.

More generally, the DGS, in consultation with the PI and committee, may grant extensions to progress requirements for students who face circumstances as noted in university regulations, including childbirth, adoption, significant responsibilities with respect to elder or dependent care obligations, disability or chronic illness, or circumstances beyond one’s personal control. The petition should provide evidence of plans and ability to return to conformance with the standard and to acceptably complete the program. The normal extension will be one semester; anything beyond this will be granted only in the event of highly extraordinary circumstances. Extensions will be granted formally with a note of explanation placed in the student’s file.

The following requirements are under the purview of the UW Graduate School and cannot be modified:

  • Composition of the Graduate Committee.
  • Standards defining Satisfactory Academic Progress.
  • Minimum credit requirement.

Doctoral Degree Requirements

The Ph.D. degree requires substantial original research, presented in the form of a dissertation. The path to the Ph.D. consists of two stages. In the first (pre-dissertator) stage, the student completes required coursework (core and minor) and starts research with their faculty research advisor (PI) in preparation for the Preliminary Examination. Once the student completes all departmental and Graduate School requirements and passes the Preliminary Examination, the student has achieved dissertator status. In this stage of the program, the student focuses on their thesis research and completes their dissertation. The student defends the dissertation in the thesis defense. The student then deposits the dissertation with the Graduate School, which is the final step to the degree. The requirements for the Ph.D. are in accordance with the department’s learning goals of the program, and UW-Madison Graduate School policy. The full details of the program requirements can be found in the GUIDE.

Course Requirements and Certificationexpand_more

Course requirements include a minimum of 51 total credits, at least 32 credits at UW-Madison, at least 26 in didactic courses (formal classes or formal seminar).

All ADS Ph.D. students must complete their certification paperwork. The student should submit all completed paperwork in a timely manner to the Graduate Program Manager for review and approval by the Director of Graduate Studies. Students should meet with their committee at minimum once per year.

Students must enroll and present in Seminar (900) during their final semester.

Mentor Committee Compositionexpand_more

The Mentor Committee members advise the student on their classes, research, other academic components of the students’ Graduate Program, evaluate satisfactory progress, administer the final oral examination, evaluate the thesis, and sign the degree warrant. The PI chairs the committee. The Final Warrant Request which includes committee membership must be submitted to the Graduate School at least three weeks before the examination date. Please review the Graduate School policy on the role and composition of committees as well as an online tool to determine if the committee meets minimum requirements.

Ph.D. Mentor Committees must have at least 4 members representing more than one graduate program, 3 of whom must be UW-Madison ADS graduate faculty or former UW-Madison ADS graduate faculty up to one year after resignation or retirement. At least one of the 4 members must be from outside the Department of ADS. At least 3 committee members of all doctoral/final oral examination committees must be designated as readers.

All members of a Mentor Committee retain voting rights. The fourth member may be from any of the following categories: graduate faculty, faculty from a department without a graduate program, academic staff (including emeritus faculty), visiting faculty, faculty from other institutions, scientists, research associates, and other individuals deemed qualified by the student’s graduate committee. We recommend that student use the Faculty List for Grad Committees tool when forming the committee.

To receive a doctoral degree, students cannot receive more than one dissenting vote from their committee on the final degree warrant.

Steps to PhDexpand_more

The below steps must be completed in a timely fashion (as outlined), or the student will not be allowed to register for following semesters. Working closely with the PI and committee are essential for successful completion of a Ph.D. The certification paperwork must be approved before the request for preliminary warrant is submitted to the Graduate School. Any changes to the certification paperwork must be communicated to the GPM and approved by the DGS.

  1. Form a Ph.D. Mentor and Examination Committee (form I) and submit completed form to the GPM (by end of 2nd Semester).
  2. Meet with approved committee to approve Plan of Study (form II) and submit completed form to the GPM (by end of 2nd Semester). Regular meetings with Committee are expected.
    1. Complete coursework (except seminar and research) prior to or within the same term as the preliminary examination. Documentation of completion is required before preliminary examination.
  3. Schedule (forms III and IV by the end of the 4th semester) and complete preliminary examination (by the end of the 5th semester). Follow specific steps under “Preliminary Examination” below.
  4. Confirm Final Ph.D. Examination Committee (form V) and submit completed form to GPM.
  5. Complete research and thesis (documentation of completion is required before defense), enroll and present in Seminar (900) during the final semester, schedule final examination, successfully complete Final Defense and Examination. Follow specific steps under “Dissertation & Final Oral Exam/Defense” below.

Preliminary Examexpand_more

Each Ph.D. candidate must pass a preliminary exam.

Goals of the Exam:

  • To assess the student’s ability to assemble research minded hypotheses supported by knowledge they have acquired in various areas,
  • To determine if the student can synthesize information they have acquired into experimental design,
  • To assess the student’s ability to demonstrate critical thinking in their area(s) of expertise,
  • To determine if the student can communicate possible impacts of the research effectively,
  • To assess the student’s ability to develop contingency plans should critical aspects of the project fail.

The preliminary exam should be scheduled by the end of your fourth semester and completed by the end of the fifth semester. The exam consists of two components – [1] a written examination prepared by each of the committee members and [2] an oral examination where questions may be asked from any area including clarification of the written examination. If the student has not scheduled their final defense by their 5th semester, then the GPM will schedule a meeting with the GPM, DGS, PI, and student to determine the barriers to student’s preliminary examination completion and make a plan for completion.

The decision for the preliminary exam, made by the Mentor Committee, is based on the soundness of the written exam as well as on the student’s ability to reason, think critically, and communicate clearly through the oral exam. Dissertator status is granted after successful completion of all coursework requirements and the preliminary exam.

Prior to the Examexpand_more

  1. ≥ 3 months before the anticipated meeting date student contacts committee members to establish a date, time, and location for the exam and reserves a room for a 4-hour time block.
    • If the meeting is to be held virtually (via web conference), the student should send the meeting date/times to their PI for scheduling the virtual meeting. The student will ascertain which web-based conferencing system the PI will use to host the meeting and gain competency in presenting materials using that web-based platform.
  2. ≥ 1 month before the scheduled meeting the student should complete and submit forms IV and V of the Ph.D. Requirements in Animal Sciences or Dairy Science form and the PhD Prelim Warrant Request form to the ADS GPM at least four weeks prior to the oral exam date.
  3. Student should complete written component of the preliminary exam – refer to the Written Preliminary Exam Guidelines.
  4. Prepare for the oral component of the preliminary exam – refer to the Oral Preliminary Exam Guidelines.

During the Examexpand_more

  1. 90-minutes: student meets with committee to answer questions regarding the written examination.
  2. 15-minutes: the student and committee members must take a 15-minute break between the question sections of the examination.
  3. 90-minutes: student meets with committee to answer open-ended, general content questions.
  4. 20-minutes: committee meets in a closed-door session to determine the exam outcome.
  5. The meeting is expected to take 2-3 hours, but should not exceed 4 hours.

After the Exam (if passed with no further actions needed)expand_more

  1. The student will gather electronic signatures on the Grad School Warrant. Students can find information about how to do this on the student instruction sheet.
  2. The PI will provide written feedback compiled from the committee members on the ADS Preliminary Examination Evaluation form to the student and the GPM within 1 week of the student completing the exam.

After the Exam (if written revisions are required)expand_more

  1. The PI will provide written feedback compiled from the committee members on the ADS Preliminary Examination Evaluation form to the student and the GPM within 1 week of the student completing the exam.
  2. The student will notify that GPM that the committee is requiring revisions.
  3. Once the student has completed revisions, the revised answers will be provided to the committee for approval. Once revisions have been approved, the PI will fill out a new ADS Preliminary Examination Evaluation form indicating “written revisions accepted by committee” in the “Feedback/Comments from the Committee” box, sign, and send to the student and GPM. If the student does not pass the second exam, follow steps under After the Exam (Fail).
  4. The student will gather electronic signatures on the Grad School Warrant. Students can find information about how to do this on the student instruction sheet.

After the Exam (if written revisions and a repeat of the oral exam are required)expand_more

  1. The PI will provide written feedback compiled from the committee members on the ADS Preliminary Examination Evaluation form to the student and the GPM within 1 week of the student completing the exam.
  2. The student will notify that GPM that the committee is requiring revisions and a repeat of the oral defense.
  3. The student will schedule a new defense with their committee and revise the written examination according to committee feedback.
  4. Once the student has successfully repeated their defense and the committee has approved the revisions, the PI will ensure a new ADS Preliminary Examination Evaluation form is filled out, signed, and returned to the student and GPM. If the student does not pass the second exam, please follow steps under After the Exam (Fail).
  5. The student will gather electronic signatures on the Grad School Warrant. Students can find information about how to do this on the student instruction sheet.

After the Exam (fail)expand_more

  1. If the preliminary exam is not successfully completed after two attempts, the student cannot continue in the ADS Program.
  2. Discuss the recommendations with the PI and the Committee.
  3. The PI will ensure the ADS Preliminary Examination Evaluation form is filled out, signed, and returned to the student and the GPM.

ENROLLEMENT REMINDER: As a dissertator, students must register for exactly 3 graduate level credits each semester to maintain continuous registration. Students must be registered during the semester in which they finish their degree. Students must enroll and present in Seminar (900) during their final semester.

Dissertator Status Requirementsexpand_more

Dissertator is a unique fee status for students who have completed all requirements for a doctoral degree except for the dissertation. To be eligible for dissertator status, a student must:

  • Pass the preliminary examination;
  • Satisfy the doctoral minimum graduate residence credit requirement;
  • Complete all minor requirements;
  • Complete all program requirements except the dissertation;
  • Clear all incomplete grades or progress grades in non-research courses (progress grades in 990 research may remain);
  • Earn at least a 3.0 cumulative graduate GPA;
  • Return the signed and dated preliminary exam warrant to the GPM.

Dissertator status is effective at the start of the semester following completion of all dissertator requirements for the doctoral degree except for the dissertation. All dissertator requirements must be met before the first day of classes to be a dissertator for any given semester.

Students will receive an email from the Graduate School when they are granted dissertator status. This email contains important information about the rules of being a dissertator. It is very important that students follow all the rules of being a dissertator otherwise they may lose their dissertator status.

The three most important rules of being a dissertator are:

  • Students must maintain continuous enrollment for exactly three credits every fall and spring (and summer if funded) until they graduate, otherwise they will be assessed a degree completion fee.
  • Students enroll for three credits of research or a required departmental seminar.
  • Students have five years from the date they passed prelims to defend and deposit their dissertation. If a student does not meet this requirement, they may be required to pass their prelim exam again before they will be allowed to receive their Ph.D. degree.

Questions regarding dissertator status rules and requirements may be answered by the Graduate School’s Dissertator Status policy

Dissertation & Final Oral Exam/Defenseexpand_more

The original research conducted by the candidate must be summarized in a thesis. When a student has completed the thesis research to the satisfaction of their PI and Mentor Committee, the student will prepare a dissertation thesis in accordance with Graduate School regulations (A Guide to Preparing Your Doctoral Dissertation Note: scroll down to view all info including deadlines). You may find the ADS Dissertation Template useful as you begin writing. Dissertations must acknowledge contributions received from individuals, including co-authors of published work that appears in the dissertation. Examples of the types of contributions that should be acknowledged in the document include those who helped design the research, execute the research, analyze the data, and/or writing, proofing, or copy editing the manuscript. This is in accordance with UW Graduate School Policy UW-1248.

If the student has not scheduled their final defense by their 10th semester, then the GPM will schedule a meeting with the GPM, DGS, PI, and student to determine the barriers to student’s program completion and make a plan for completion. If the PhD Final Defense is not completed within five years of passing their preliminary examination, the student must re-take the preliminary exam, or ask for an extension from the Graduate School and notify the DGS of this request. If changes in the Mentor Committee are made after a warrant has been requested from the Graduate School, then a revised form must be signed and submitted to the Graduate School for approval.

The oral examination covers the thesis and the general field of the major and minor studies. The Mentor Committee administers the thesis defense, through both the seminar, which is open to the public unless otherwise requested, and the defense. The candidate may not take the final oral examination until all other requirements for the degree have been satisfied.

For additional information, please review the Graduate School’s Completing Your Doctoral Degree page.

Dissertation formatting requirementsexpand_more

The Department of ADS does not have distinct formatting requirements, however, ADS has developed a Dissertation Template to assist you in writing.

Students should follow the Graduate School’s requirements which can be found at “Formatting Requirements for your Doctoral Dissertation.”

Helpful Links for Writing your Research Proposal and Dissertation:

Depositing Your Dissertation:

Students must deposit their dissertation and graduation forms with the Graduate School by the degree deadline. It may take up to three months after graduation term for a degree to be posted to a student’s record.

Prior to the Examexpand_more

  1. At the beginning of the semester, students must enroll in Seminar (900) during their final semester. Students must present their research during their final semester in this course.
  2. ≥ 6 weeks before the anticipated meeting date student contacts committee members to establish a date, time, and location for the exam and reserves a room for a 4-hour time block.
    • If the meeting is to be held virtually (via web conference), the student should send the meeting date/times to their PI for scheduling the virtual meeting. The student will ascertain which web-based conferencing system the PI will use to host the meeting and gain competency in presenting materials using that web-based platform.
  3. ≥ 1 month before the scheduled meeting the student should submit Proposed D. Final Examination Committee (form VI), Requirements to be met prior to Ph.D. Final Examination (form VII), and the Ph.D. Final Warrant Request form to the GPM at least four weeks prior to the oral exam date.
  4. Student should submit thesis to all members of Mentor Committee ≥2 weeks prior to the exam date.
  5. Student should submit to the GPM (via email) a seminar notice of the final PhD Defense that includes the Thesis Title, Abstract, Author, Date, and Location at least 1 week prior to the defense date.
  6. Prepare materials (suggestions/approximate times below):
    • The open session consists of a formal public seminar (approximately 45-50 min) followed by a short public question and answer period
      • 45 minutes: presentation of thesis which must be acceptable from both scientific and literary standpoints.
      • 15 minutes: question/answer period where anyone can participate
    • The closed session immediately follows the open session and consists of an examination period wherein only the examinee and Mentor Committee are present
      • 90 minutes: student completes oral examination with committee
      • 15 minutes: committee determines the exam outcome and notifies student
      • The meeting is expected to take 2-3 hours, but should not exceed 4 hours

During the Examexpand_more

  1. Present the seminar on dissertation research and answer questions from the public.
  2. Defend the thesis orally in a closed session with the committee.
  3. After the examination, the committee will determine the outcome (Pass; Request Written Revisions; Request Written Revisions and a repeat of the Oral Defense; or Fail) concerning the student’s performance and document feedback on PhD Final Dissertation and Defense form.

After the Exam (if passed with no further actions needed)expand_more

  1. The student must complete the Graduate School steps.
    • Final grade reports must be completed for all courses in progress when student deposits the dissertation.
  2. The student will request electronic signatures on the Graduate School Warrant. Students should request the signatures following the student instruction sheet.
  3. The PI will provide written feedback compiled from the committee members on the PhD Final Dissertation and Defense Evaluation form to the student and the GPM within 1 week of the student completing the exam.

After the Exam (if written revisions are required)expand_more

  1. The PI will provide written feedback compiled from the committee members on the PhD Final Dissertation and Defense Evaluation form to the student and the GPM within 1 week of the student completing the exam.
  2. The student will notify that GPM that the committee is requiring revisions.
  3. Once the student has completed revisions, the revised thesis will be provided to the committee for approval. Once revisions have been approved, the PI will fill out a new PhD Final Dissertation and Defense Evaluation form indicating “written revisions accepted by committee” in the “Feedback / Comments from the Committee” box, sign, and send to the student and GPM.
  4. The student must complete the Graduate School steps.
    • Final grade reports must be completed for all courses in progress when student deposits the dissertation.
  5. The student will gather electronic signatures on the Grad School Warrant. Students can find information about how to do this on the student instruction sheet.

After the Exam (if written revisions and a repeat of the oral defense are required)expand_more

  1. The PI will provide written feedback compiled from the committee members on the PhD Final Dissertation and Defense Evaluation form to the student and the GPM within 1 week of the student completing the exam.
  2. The student will notify that GPM that the committee is requiring revisions.
  3. Once the student has completed revisions, the revised thesis will be provided to the committee for approval. Once revisions have been approved, the PI will fill out a new PhD Final Dissertation and Defense Evaluation form indicating “written revisions accepted by committee” in the “Feedback / Comments from the Committee” box, sign, and send to the student and GPM.
  4. The student must complete the Graduate School steps.
    • Final grade reports must be completed for all courses in progress when student deposits the dissertation.
  5. The student will gather electronic signatures on the Grad School Warrant. Students can find information about how to do this on the student instruction sheet.

After the Exam (fail)expand_more

  1. If the Final Exam is not successfully completed after two attempts, the student cannot continue in the ADS Program.
  2. The student must discuss recommendations with the PI and the Committee.
    1. The PI must communicate the recommendations to the GPM.
  3. The PI will ensure the PhD Final Dissertation and Defense Evaluation form is filled out, signed, and returned to the student and the GPM.

Completing a Minor expand_more

The Department of ADS requires Ph.D. students to complete a minor before they can be granted dissertator status. There are two minor options:

Option A External Minor: Requires a minimum of nine credits in a single department/program. Selection of this option requires the approval of the minor department/program. Students interested in an Option A minor should contact the minor department.

Graduate School Minor Information: grad.wisc.edu/documents/minors/

Option B Distributed Minor: Requires a minimum of nine credits in one or more departments/programs and can include course work in the major department/program. Selection of this option requires the approval of your thesis committee.

Option A minors appear on the transcript with the name of the minor (i.e., Statistics).

Option B minor always appears on the transcript as Distributed.

Minors of interest to ADS majors may include the following – Option B (distributed): 

See a list of all minors available: guide.wisc.edu/graduate/#doctoralminorstext

Enrollment Requirements expand_more

The department requires all funded students to be enrolled full time. Students funded by another department should check with the payroll and benefits coordinator of that department to learn their requirements for enrollment. Please review the minimum enrollment requirements for additional clarification. You are responsible for following Graduate School policies related to course enrollment requirements and limitations: 

Degree Deadlines expand_more

Degree deadlines are the cut-off dates for a degree and dissertation eligibility in each term, and it is important to keep abreast of these dates when planning to graduate.

View the following for additional information: Graduate School Deadlines

Requirement Exceptionsexpand_more

Academic exceptions are considered on a case-by-case basis and should not be considered a precedent. Deviations from normal progress are highly discouraged, but the program recognizes that there are cases extenuating academic and personal circumstances. Petitions for course exceptions/substitutions or exceptions to Satisfactory Academic Progress shall be directed to the DGS and will be considered by the Research and Graduate Education Committee (RGEC).

The following procedures apply to all petitions:

  1. The specific requirement/rule/expectation pertinent to the petition must be identified.
  2. The PI must provide written support for the petition to the GPM and the DGS. The request should include a justification statement and a detailed explanation of the substitution proposed to meet the requirement.
  3. All course work substitutions and equivalencies will be decided by the DGS.

More generally, the DGS, in consultation with the PI and committee, may grant extensions to progress requirements for students who face circumstances as noted in university regulations, including childbirth, adoption, significant responsibilities with respect to elder or dependent care obligations, disability or chronic illness, or circumstances beyond one’s personal control. The petition should provide evidence of plans and ability to return to conformance with the standard and to acceptably complete the program. The normal extension will be one semester; anything beyond this will be granted only in the event of highly extraordinary circumstances. Extensions will be granted formally with a note of explanation placed in the student’s file.

The following requirements are under the purview of the UW Graduate School and cannot be modified:

  • Composition of the Graduate Committee.
  • Standards defining Satisfactory Academic Progress.
  • Minimum credit requirement.

Leave of Absence expand_more

While most student participation in the program is continuous, students may find it necessary to take a temporary leave of absence. Graduate students may request a leave of absence for one semester or for one year by sending an email to the GPM outlining the timeline for the leave and general reasons. The PI must agree that the student is leaving in good standing and may re-enter the program in a reasonable stated length of time. The DGS will review all leave of absence requests.

If a student is granted a one semester leave of absence, the milestone due dates and terminal deadlines are pushed back one semester. If a student is granted a full year leave of absence, all due dates and deadlines are pushed back one year. Students may be granted a leave of absence for no more than one year at a time.

Students who do not register for more than one semester (Fall or Spring) will be considered inactive by Graduate School standards and must apply for re-entry.  Students who take a leave of absence and are in good standing are likely to be approved for re-entry upon return. Prior funding guarantees may or may not continue to be in effect and will be decided on a case-by-case basis. A leave of absence is not required for summer term as summer term is not a required term of enrollment if a student is not being paid as a graduate assistant or fellow.

Re-entry

Graduate students who leave the program in good standing for more than one term (not including summer) may request re-entry to the program by completing the Graduate School application for re-admission. Department leadership will review the request based on the information provided at the time the student plans to return.

The Graduate School outlines the policy for readmission for previously enrolled graduate students.

Time Limits

In addition, the Graduate School specifies time limits for completion of current coursework and research.  Students who take a leave of absence or re-enter into the program should be aware of these policies.

Progress Improvement Plan

Sample Progress Improvement Plan

Annual Progress Report

Sample Progress Report Form

MS Meeting Checklist

PhD Meeting Checklist

MS Warrant Request Form

PhD Prelim Warrant Request Form

PhD Final Warrant Request Form

Written Preliminary Examination Guidelines

Oral Preliminary Examination Guidelines